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Can we catch ‘em all?: Generation I

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{{CategorizeIn|Columns|11|14}}
 
"Tajiri had a novel idea: to utilize the tsushin keburu [Game Boy Link Cable] for ‘communication’ instead – for exchanges between players in which the objective would be to barter with, rather than eliminate, an opponent by training monsters.” - Anne Allison, ''Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination'' <ref name="Allison, ''Millennial Monsters.''">Anne Allison, ''Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination'' (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006).</ref>
- Anne Allison, ''Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination'' <ref name="Allison, ''Millennial Monsters.''">Anne Allison, ''Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination'' (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006).</ref>
 
Twenty years ago, many players first encountered a video game through its advertisement campaign. Nintendo, in particular, was notorious for tightly controlling advertisement through censorship of unwelcome critiques in Japanese gaming magazines. This control went even farther in the United States, where the company-run {{bp|Nintendo Power}} essentially functioned as a subscription advertising campaign. As a result, marketing controlled how players understood their games.<ref name="Allison, ''Millennial Monsters.''"/> Nowhere is this more obvious than in {{bp|Generation I|Generation I core series titles}}.